Event Calendar



All Campuses


Ghana Study Abroad: Healthcare & Society

CCBC School of Health Professions and Sociology students are invited to apply for a faculty-led Study Abroad Program to Accra and Cape Coast, Ghana in January 2020.

Contact Erin Myers: emyers@ccbcmd.edu

A Day of Service and Learning

Friday, September 28, 2018

The CCBC Service Learning Team will partner with the Black Yield Institute and the Black Church Food Security Network for an enjoyable day of learning and volunteering to promote food justice in Baltimore. Wear work clothes.

For details, contact Lee Tydings, ltydings@ccbcmd.edu (Catonsville and Owings Mills) or Victoria Johnson, vjohnson4@ccbcmd.edu (Essex and Dundalk)

Field Trip to Reginald F. Lewis Museum, lunch included

Saturday, October 20, 2018, 9:00am-3:00pm

Student pick-up: 9:00 am Dundalk, outside the Roy N. Staten Building (STAT); 9:30 am Essex, outside the Student Services Center (SSRV); 9:30am Catonsville, outside the Student Services Center (SSRV).

Co-sponsor: Office of Intercultural Engagement.

Contact Patricia Quintero-Hall: phall@ccbcmd.edu


CCBC Catonsville


‘A Song Worth Singing’: Slavery, Migration, and Generational Trauma in Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing and August Wilson’s Joe Turner’s Come and Gone

CCBC Academic Theatre Performance of Joe Turner’s Come and Gone Thursday, November 1, 11:10am - approx. 1:30pm

Catonsville, Center for the Arts Theatre

CCBC Academic Theatre and Office of Performing Arts presents August Wilson’s 1984 play Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, the second in a series of Wilson’s The Century Cycle. This play takes place in 1910 and chronicles the lives of a few formerly enslaved African Americans in the North.

Contact Cohen Ambrose: cambrose2@ccbcmd.edu

‘A Song Worth Singing,’ Reception

Thursday, November 1, Approx. 1:30pm-2:20pm

Catonsville, ARTS Building, Center for the Arts Lounge

Join the cast, crew, creative team, and guest scholar, Dr. Harvey Young of Boston University at a post-performance reception following the opening of Joe Turner’s Come and Gone.

Contact Cohen Ambrose: cambrose2@ccbcmd.edu

‘A Song Worth Singing’ Masterclass with Dr. Harvey Young

Thursday, November 1, 2:30pm-3:55pm

Catonsville, ARTS Building, Center for the Arts Lounge

Join preeminent scholar, historian, cultural theorist, and educator Dr. Harvey Young of Boston University for a post-performance discussion and seminar on the themes and ideas in Homegoing and Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, as well as career paths in the arts and humanities. RSVP please.

Contact Cohen Ambrose: cambrose2@ccbcmd.edu

CCBC Academic Theater presents Joe Turner’s Come and Gone by August Wilson

Thursday, November 1, 11:10am

Friday, November 2, 7:00pm

Saturday, November 3, 7:00pm

Sunday November 4, 3:00pm

Monday, November 5, 10:00am

Catonsville, Center for the Arts Theatre

CBC Workshop: Genealogy & Family History

Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 12:45pm-2:15pm

Catonsville, Student Services Building, 004

Participants will learn how to read and understand family trees/pedigree charts— and will get hands-on experience in completing their family tree; and learn how to research further into their heritage. Participants will also learn about DNA kits; the Geographic DNA Ancestry Kit; and a website tool to see similarities between species among genes.

Contact Robin Minor: rminor@ccbcmd.edu

Celebrate Ghana: Africans on Both Sides of the Atlantic

Wednesday, November 14, 11:15am-12:10pm

Catonsville, Jack Manley Wellness and Athletics Center

In conjunction with International Education Week celebrations, Ghanaian students will share stories about their homeland and their journey. Faculty and Staff who are from Ghana/or whose ancestors were from Ghana are invited to share. Co-sponsors: Office of International Student Services, Office of Intercultural Engagement, GEAB, and the African Student Union.

Contact Nellie Pharr-Maletta: npharrmaletta@ccbcmd.edu

Grounded in History, Moving Forward: Using Contemplative Practice to Understand Root Shock and Social Change

Thursday, November 15, 2018, 11:10am-12:35pm

Catonsville, Barn Theater

Scholar activist, Marisela Gomez, will lead a workshop on root shock, exploring the stress associated with loss of an emotional support system due to being uprooted or displaced from one’s community. This workshop will incorporate the historical context of race and class in Baltimore and engage students in contemplative practice in order to imagine solutions. Co-sponsored by the Office of Intercultural Engagement and the Institute for Social and Economic Justice.

Contact Contact Amy Pucino: apucino@ccbcmd.edu or Stephanie Briggs: sbriggs@ccbcmd.edu


CCBC Dundalk


In Celebration of LGBTQ+ History Month: Film and Discussion: Surrender

Thursday, October 11, 2018, 11:10am–12:35pm

Dundalk, College Communication Building, 226

In a small fishing community in the East Coast of Zanzibar, a fire is raging in the hearts of three young individuals and the entire community feels the heat. Surrender is a story about Amri, a man trapped between traditional expectations and his personal desire for Mashua, a local fisherman. A guided discussion will follow. Refreshments will be provided. Co-Sponsors: Sexual Minorities Advocacy Committee (S.M.A.C.) and the Office of Intercultural Engagement.

Contact Patricia Quintero-Hall: phall@ccbcmd.edu

Film and Discussion: One Drop Rule

Tuesday, October 16, 2018, 12:45pm-2:10 pm

Dundalk, Career Building, 213

One Drop Rule explores a recurring and divisive issue in African American communities: skin color. It investigates this sensitive topic within the black community with great tact and a commitment to healing divisions. A guided discussion will follow. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsor: Office of Intercultural Engagement.

Contact Patricia Quintero-Hall: phall@ccbcmd.edu

Capitalism, Discrimination and Lost History: A Discussion Series Based on Homegoing Am I my Brother’s Keeper? Africans and the Cape Coast Castle

Tuesday, November 20, 2018, 2:20pm-3:45pm

Dundalk, College Communication Building, 226

The Office of Intercultural Engagement will host this discussion covering the taboo subject regarding the involvement of Africans in the Transatlantic slave trade as a result of European colonization. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsor: Office of Intercultural Engagement.

Contact Patricia Quintero-Hall: phall@ccbcmd.edu


CCBC Essex


Capitalism, Discrimination and Lost History: A Discussion Series Based on Homegoing. Am I my Brother’s Keeper? Africans and the Cape Coast Castle

Thursday, September 13, 12:45pm-2:00pm

Essex, Romadka Building, 123

The Office of Intercultural Engagement will host this discussion covering the taboo subject regarding the involvement of Africans in the Transatlantic slave trade as a result of European colonization. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsor: Office of Intercultural Engagement.

Contact Kanika Jackson: kjackson6@ccbcmd.edu

Film Screening and Panel Discussion: “Baltimore’s Strange Fruit: A Story of Food Apartheid and the Struggle for Sovereignty”

Thursday, September 20, 2018, 2:20pm-4:10pm

Essex, Romadka Building, 123

“Baltimore’s Strange Fruit: A Story of Food Apartheid and the Struggle for Sovereignty,” produced by Black Yield Institute and directed by organizer and educator Eric Jackson and Maddie Hardy. Join the filmmaker and a panel of experts to examine the complex nature of food apartheid in Baltimore, and community- based solutions. Co-sponsored by the Africana Studies Film Festival. Free snacks.

Contact Ingrid Sabio: isabio@ccbcmd.edu

Seminar and Discussion with Dr. Harvey Young: ‘A Song Worth Singing’: Slavery, Migration, and Generational Trauma in Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing and August Wilson’s Joe Turner’s Come and Gone

Friday, November 2, 11:15am-12:30pm

Essex, Administration Building, 110

Join preeminent scholar, writer, historian, cultural theorist, and educator Dr. Harvey Young of Boston University for a lively seminar and discussion on the themes and ideas in Homegoing and Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, as well as career paths in the arts and humanities.

Contact Cohen Ambrose: cambrose2@ccbcmd.edu or or Kim Jensen: kjensen@ccbcmd.edu

Grounded in History, Moving Forward: Using Contemplative Practice to Understand Root Shock and Social Change

Thursday, November 8, 9:35am-11:00am

Essex, Romadka Building, Upper Lobby

Scholar activist, Marisela Gomez, will lead a workshop on root shock, exploring the stress associated with loss of an emotional support system due to being uprooted or displaced from one’s community. This workshop will incorporate the historical context of race and class in Baltimore and engage students in contemplative practice in order to imagine solutions. Co-sponsored by the Office of Intercultural Engagement and the Institute for Social and Economic Justice.

Contact Contact Amy Pucino: apucino@ccbcmd.edu or Stephanie Briggs: sbriggs@ccbcmd.edu

Film Screening and Discussion: “Baltimore’s Strange Fruit: A Story of Food Apartheid and the Struggle for Sovereignty”

Film Screening: Tuesday, November 13, 11:10am-12:30pm

Discussion & Reception: Tuesday, November 13, 12:45pm-2:00pm

Essex, Romadka Building, 123

The Africana Studies Film Festival presents a second screening of the documentary by organizer and educator Eric Jackson and Maddie Hardy. Join the filmmaker/s to examine the complex nature of food apartheid in Baltimore, and community-based solutions.

Contact Cohen Ambrose: cambrose2@ccbcmd.edu

Most events are FREE and open to the public. For more information about the Community Book Connection, email Dr. Kim Jensen, kjensen@ccbcmd.edu, or visit us on Facebook