BIOL 230
MICROBIOLOGY

LECTURE E-TEXT
PREFACE

 

A. Course Description: BIOL 230 - 4 credits - MICROBIOLOGY

Introduces concepts related to the study of bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi. These microorganisms maintain both beneficial and pathogenic relationships with humans, and concepts related to both types of relationships will be examined. This course emphasizes basic laboratory techniques such as microscopy, staining, and aseptic technique.

3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours

 

B. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 with a final grade of “C” or higher; MATH 073 or MATH 083

 

C. Your Syllabus

Everything you need to know regarding the workings of this course can be found in your syllabus as well as on the course website at http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/index.html. The first thing you need to do is carefully read every page of the course syllabus. You can read it on-line or print a PDF hard-copy from my website menu. Note that while the course content is NOT directly on Blackboard, you can access the course materials through Blackboard. My lecture E-text, the on-line version of my Laboratory Manual, syllabus, and all other materials needed in this course can be found on my faculty website.

For a more detailed description of lecture topics, laboratory topics, and other information relevant to this course, go to the course website at http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/index.html and click on “Course Info.”

D. Statement of Student Out-Of-Class Work Expectations

The number one reason why students do not successfully complete this course is procrastination!

Make sure you keep up with both lecture and lab learning objectives each week! (Each day during summer session!)

 

E. Getting Started in Lab

Lab is worth 30% of your grade. Since lab provides a critical hands-on experience critical to to the understanding of microbiology, attendance in the majority of labs is essential. Lab quizzes are a combination of multiple choice, matching, short answer, practical, and critical thinking questions.

1. Purchase or print-off a hard-copy of your lab manual The Grapes of Staph: A Microbiology Laboratory Manual by Kaiser and bring it to each laboratory session. You can either purchase a copy of this manual from the Catonsville campus bookstore in the K-building or print your own PDF copy from the link on my website in the menu on the left.

When using the hard-copy of your Lab Manual for studying, make sure you use it in conjunction with the on-line version to take advantage of the hundreds of illustrations, animations, photomicrographs, and electron micrographs included.

2. Read the lab exercises in advance of lab so you are familiar with what is being done that day. The lab schedule can be found under "Course Info" in the menu of my course website.

3. There are Concept Maps for each of the labs. These can be found by clicking on "Puzzles and Concept Maps" in the course website menu. There are also direct links to the finished Concept Maps in the online Lab Manual itself. The Concept Maps include direct links to relevant illustrations, photographs, photomicrographs, and Flash animations in your E-Lab Manual. The Concept Maps provide a nice summary of the keypoints of that lab exercise.

4. Lab quizzes will be a combination of multiple choice, matching, short answer, practical, and critical thinking questions. Questions will come directly from the Learning Objectives found at the end of each lab exercise in your lab manual. As soon as possible after each lab session, write out the answers to each objective. Remember that your online lab manual contains a color photograph of everything we look at in lab. Reviewing these photographs will be a big help in preparing for the practical portion of each lab quiz. Using the Learning Objectives as a guide, make up and ask yourself possible test questions and practice writing and saying the answers. Each lab quiz also has an optional crossword puzzle to help learn vocabulary. Each puzzle is worth 1 point of extra credit. Crossword puzzles can be found and printed by clicking on "Puzzles and Concept Maps" in the course website menu.

5. Lab quizzes will be given in lab prior to beginning that day's assigned lab exercise. Lab quiz dates can be found on the "Course Calendar" on the course website, as well as and under "Important Dates" in your syllabus.

6. We have no facilities for making up a missed lab unless you attend one of the other lab sections on the Catonsville campus doing that lab that week.

7. Since lab provides a critical hands-on component to the understanding of Microbiology, attendance in the majority of labs is essential. Twelve of our lab exercises are considered "core labs" and students will be graded on their mastery of lab techniques for each of these labs. Student performance during each of these 12 core labs is worth 10 points for a total of 120 points. Your instructor will allow you to miss only one core labs and only for a valid and documented reason. If the core lab involves inoculation and incubation, 5 core points will be based on  performance during the inoculation lab and 5 points for the results the following lab period. Unless you are able to attend one of the other lab sections doing the lab you miss the week it is missed, there is no way to make up a missed core lab. For more information on the core labs, see "Course Info" on the course website.

8. Labs 12, Lab 14, Lab 15, and the Final Group Project are all case study-based identification of bacterial unknown. Each of these will require you to turn in a detailed lab report for grading and they will collectively be worth 125 points. (During summer session, two of these (Lab 12 and the Final Project) will require you to turn in a detailed lab reports for grading and they will collectively be worth 75 points.) For more information on the Case Study Lab Reports, see "Course Info" on the course website.

9. Review the "Hints for Success" under "Course Info" on the course website.

 

F. Getting Started in Lecture

Lecture is worth 70% of your grade in the course. Lecture exams are a combination of multiple choice, matching, discussion, and critical thinking questions.

1. You will need a hard-copy of your microbiology E-text, BIOL 230 - Microbiology: Lecture E-Text and Learning Objectives by Kaiser. You can either purchase a copy of this manual from the Catonsville campus bookstore in the K-building or print your own PDF copy from the link on my website and clicking on "PDF Lecture E-Text in the menu on the left.

When using the hard-copy of your E-text for studying, make sure you use it in conjunction with the on-line version to take advantage of the hundreds of illustrations, animations, photomicrographs, and electron micrographs included.

2. Your lecture E-text for this course, has been created as a series nesting Learning Objects. A Learning Object is basically a digital resource that is used as an element to support learning experiences. In constructing each of my Learning Objects I've tried to include:

3. First read the "Overall Purpose" for the Learning Object you are going to study. This gives you a general description of what we are going to learn in that Learning Object.

4. Now click on "Learning Objectives for This Section" and write out these objectives on which you will be tested. Any objective could be tested for by way of multiple choice, matching, or true/false questions. Objectives indicated by (*) indicate content that is a common theme throughout the course; objectives indicated by (**) need to be known in greater depth and also represent a common theme throughout the course. These questions will not only test your knowledge of the topic but also your ability to understand processes and apply that knowledge.

5. Go back and carefully read the Learning Object you are studying and answer each Learning Objective you have just written down. Don't forget to look at all illustrations, animations, and photographs for that section. Make note of any visuals that are particularly useful in understanding and learning a particular objective. Review the "Hints for Success" under "Course Information" on the course website.

6. Study the objectives until you can answer each without looking at the answer.

7. Click on "Quiz Yourself on This Section" and try to answer the self quiz. Click on (ans) to see if you are correct.

8. There are Concept Maps for most of the Learning Objects. These can be found by clicking on "Puzzles and Concept Maps" in the website menu. There are also direct links to the finished Concept Maps in the Learning Objects themselves. Use the "Unfinished Map" and the "Keywords and Phrases for Map" as a self-quiz. The "Finished Concept Map" is the completed map and includes direct links to relevant illustrations, photographs, photomicrographs, and Flash animations in your E-text. The Concept Maps provide a nice summary of the keypoints of that topic.

9 . The Lecture Schedule can be found under "Course Info" in the menu of my course website and the exam dates can be found on the "Course Calendar" on the course website, as well as under "Important Dates" in your syllabus.

10. Lecture exams are a combination of matching, multiple choice, true/false, and critical thinking questions. Each lecture exam also has an optional crossword puzzle to help learn vocabulary. Each puzzle is worth 1 point of extra credit. Crossword puzzles can be found and printed by clicking on "Puzzles and Concept Maps" in the course website menu.

11. All lectures contain at least one active learning activity where small groups of students will work to answer critical thinking questions, complete concept maps, or use audience response (clicker) systems. While answers are not graded, students are expected to participate in active learning lecture activities. Class participation in lecture is worth a total of 69 points (3 points per lecture; 2 points if you arrive late or leave early). Since participation, not merely attendance, is critical to learning, 15 of the 69 points will be deducted from the total participation points of students who attended but never or seldom participated in active learning during lecture. Attendance cards will be passed out at the beginning of each lecture period and collected at the end of class.

12. Sign up for my BIOL 230 Facebook page by logging into your Facebook account, searching for "Dr. Kaiser BIOL 230 Page" and clicking Like. Students can use this page to communicate with one another regarding the course, participate in discussions relative to microbiology, and receive reminders of upcoming course events.

13. You will notice many "boxed" links as you go through the online E-text. Some are required viewing, others are optional. They include the following:

a. Yellow boxes with links indicate reusable Learning Objects. These either review a Learning Object previously covered or preview a future Learning Object. These are for optional viewing.

Review or Preview

 

 

b. Brown boxes with links indicate sources outside my website such as online journals or textbooks. These are for optional viewing.

Outside Source

 

 

c. Light blue-green boxes with links indicate highlighted microorganisms. These are required viewing and are tested by a matching question where you match the microbe with its description as part of the lecture exam.

Highlighted Microbe

 

d. Blue boxes with links to Concept Maps link you to completed concept maps on that Learning Object with links to relevant illustrations and animations in your E-text. These are useful study aids for some of the more complex Learnin Objects. These are a great study aid for your exams and quizzes!

Concept map

 

 

e. (def) indicates a definition of a term previously used or a term that will be defined later in the course. These there if you need them but you won't be tested on definitions not listed in the Learning Objectives for the Learning Object you are studying.

f. Gray boxes are links to critical thinking Think-Pair-Share Questions that will be done during class in lecture. Students will read the questions and then be given 30 seconds to look over their notes and think about answers to the questions. Students will then pair up and be given 2-3 minutes to discuss possible answers with their partner. Finally, pairs will share their answers with the rest of the class.

TPS Question

 

 

 

G. BIOL 230 Course Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

1. classify organisms using appropriate terminology related to their structure, metabolism, genetics and ecology;
2. differentiate between opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms and explain how contact with susceptible hosts can result in infection and/or disease;
3. explain innate and adaptive immune responses as they apply to the infectious disease process;
4. explain principles of physical and chemical methods used in the control of microorganisms;
5. assess methods of prevention and control of diseases based on acquired knowledge of immune responses and methods of microbial growth control;
6. demonstrate appropriate laboratory skills and techniques related to the isolation, staining, identification, assessment of metabolism, and control of microorganisms;
7. develop the ability to work both independently and with others in the laboratory and draw appropriate conclusions from laboratory results; and
8. develop an information base for making personal health decisions in regard to infectious diseases.

 

H. CCBC Online Technical Support: 24/7 Help Desk

See CCBC Online Support Help Desk, available 24/7.

 

I. CCBC Student Support Services

See http://ccbcmd.edu/services/index.html.

 

J. Study Tips

You may find the following study tips useful:

1. For those students taking the traditional lecture, attend lecture regularly, concentrate on what is being said, try to understand what is being explained (much easier now than later) and if you don't understand, ask questions right away. For those taking lecture via the Internet, establish a routine schedule for working on the course, keep up with the course, and do all interactive activities provided. The minute you have any questions or need help, E-mail or call me!

2. As soon as possible after each lecture, write out the answers to each objective covered. Many find it helpful to write each objective on one side of a note card and then write the answer on the back. Studies show that people learn material faster and retain it longer if that information is written by hand, or even better, written and spoken aloud, rather than just read. In other words, combine visual memory, muscle memory (writing), and auditory memory. The more senses you use, the better you remember.

3. Quiz yourself. Using the Learning Objectives as a guide, make up and ask yourself possible test questions and write and say the answers. Make sure you do the on-line practice quizzes. Do not just click on the answers and write them out. This will not test your understanding of the topic.

4. Do not cram! Set up a regular weekly study schedule at a regular study location free of distractions and stick to it. However, make the schedule reasonable. Study the information in small, regular amounts, maybe one or two hours at a time, and then review the accumulated information weekly. Before you take the exam, review all material a final time until you feel reasonably confident. Again, studies show that in doing this, you spend less total time studying and you retain the information longer.

5. To remember the information, write and rewrite the answers to the objectives, say it aloud to yourself, explain it aloud to yourself (or a patient friend), devise clue words to remember important points, use word associations, create visual pictures or images in your mind of the topic and the clue words you are studying, create acronyms and abbreviations for lists of information, etc. In other words, be creative rather than using rote repetition.

6. To help you understand and learn the material presented in the Lecture E-text, an extensive series of illustrations, animations, photomicrographs, electron micrographs, and links to other microbiology-related sites on the web has been included. These are to be used hand-in-hand with the lecture text to illustrate and enable you to visualize many of the principles discussed. Make use of these visual aids!

7. Make use of the interactive Concept Maps and the Crossword Puzzles to help you learn and review lecture materials.

8. After you feel you understand the information, study with a friend or small study group (but only after you think you understand the material). Explaining the material to others helps you remember it better and catches any misinformation you may have learned.

I hope you enjoy microbiology and find the course meaningful. Feel free to contact me any time you have questions!

Acknowledgments


I would like to gratefully acknowledge a number of people without whose support this work would not have been possible. Thanks to my great friend and fellow microbiologist Dr. David Jeffrey for his unending support, encouragement, and friendship over these many years. Between us we now have 80 years of teaching experience at CCBC. Also thanks to my good friend and our Biology Technicians Mr. Robert Hudson for all his work in making the labs possible. I will always extend thanks to my former Division Chair, the late Dr. Robert Sawyer who first planted the idea of a Lecture Guide in my mind during my first year teaching at this college and over the years always supported my efforts at developing new teaching tools and encouraged my attempts at desktop and Web publishing. Thanks to my former Divisional Dean Dr. Donna Linksz for her continual support and encouragement ofn my Web efforts. Continuous thanks to my friend and colleague Ms. Paula Noeller, my computer and Web mentor. Almost everything I know about Web publishing she has taught me. Many thanks also to Ms. Nancey Meyer, our former but treasured biology administrative aide and my dear friend for always being there for me. I would also like to thank my students, past, present, and future for continually making this an enjoyable and rewarding profession. It is truly appreciated and after 43 years of teaching I can honestly say that it is still a great pleasure to come into work each day! Finally, my complete love and heartfelt thanks to my wife and fellow CCBC biologist Dr. Sonja Schmitz. You are my dream-maker!


G.E. Kaiser
Copyright © 1995-2013 Gary E. Kaiser


Updated: August, 2013