Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics:
Producing an Altered Target Site to which the Antibiotic No Longer Binds

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Some antibiotics work by binding to a bacterial ribosomal subunit, altering the ribosome, and blocking bacterial protein synthesis. This bacterium becomes resistant to the antibiotic by altering the antibiotic's target site, in this case a 50S ribosomal subunit. The drug is no longer able to bind to the ribosome and the bacterium can still carry out normal protein synthesis.


Flash animation illustrating Bacterial Resistance to Antibiotics: Producing an Altered Target Site to which the Antibiotic No Longer Binds.swf by Gary E. Kaiser, Ph.D.
Professor of Microbiology, The Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville Campus
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/index.html.

Creative Commons License

Last updated: September, 2018
Please send comments and inquiries to Dr. Gary Kaiser