I. BACTERIAL PATHOGENESIS

B. VIRULENCE FACTORS THAT PROMOTE BACTERIAL COLONIZATION OF THE HOST

5. The ability to resist innate immune defenses such as phagocytosis and complement

c. The ability to resist phagocytic destruction

Fundamental Statements for this Learning Object:

1. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by preventing fusion of the lysosome with the phagosome.
2. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by
escaping from the phagosome before the lysosome fuses.
3. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by
preventing acidification of the phagosome.
4. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by
resisting killing by lysosomal chemicals.
5. Some bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by killing phagocytes.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES FOR THIS SECTION


In this section on Bacterial Pathogenesis we are looking at virulence factors that promote bacterial colonization of the host. The following are virulence factors that promote bacterial colonization of the host .

1. The ability to use motility and other means to contact host cells and disseminate within a host.
2. The ability to adhere to host cells and resist physical removal.
3. The ability to invade host cells.
4. The ability to compete for iron and other nutrients.
5. The ability to resist innate immune defenses such as phagocytosis and complement.
6. The ability to evade adaptive immune defenses.

Some bacteria are able to resist phagocytosis and interfere with the body's complement pathways. We will break this down into two categories:

1. The ability to resist phagocytic engulfment (attachment and ingestion)

2. The ability to resist phagocytic destruction

We will now look at the ability of bacteria to resist phagocytic destruction and complement serum lysis.


5. The Ability to Resist Innate Immune Defenses such as Phagocytosis and Complement

c. The Ability to Resist Phagocytic Destruction

 

Bacteria resist phagocytic destruction by a variety of means.

a. Resisting phagocytic destruction: preventing fusion of the lysosome with the phagosome.

b. Resisting phagocytic destruction: escaping from the phagosome.

c. Resisting phagocytic destruction: preventing acidification of the phagosome.

d. Resisting phagocytic destruction: resisting killing by lysosomal chemicals.

e. Resisting phagocytic destruction: killing the phagocyte
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Medscape article on infections associated with organisms mentioned in this Learning Object. Registration to access this website is free.

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Gary E. Kaiser, Ph.D.
Professor of Microbiology
The Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville Campus
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~gkaiser/index.html.

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Last updated: August, 2019
Please send comments and inquiries to Dr. Gary Kaiser